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Hip Hop, Grime and Rap. What’s the difference?

What is Grime Music? How is it different to Rap?

In this day and age there is so much music out there that the lines between genres are blurred, but this isn’t necessarily a bad thing…

Hip-hop, rap and grime all seem to hold similar elements and fit within one another. Without realising, you could be listening to multiple genres at once but how, why, and why do we love it so much?

Rhyme became rap, rap became hip-hop and hip-hop became grime. Each step of this musical evolution oozes excellence due to the creativity of the artist’s voice and mind.

The roots of rap date back to the early 1900s and West Africa, where stories were told rhythmically over drum beats and decorative instrumental. But the rap we know today moved from Africa over to the US and blessed our ears from the 70s onwards.

Grandmaster Flash And The Furious Five and Salt-N-Pepa from the 80’s exemplify the famous vintage rap sound that we recognise today and I can assure you that, if it hasn’t happened already, these sounds will be cranked up on the stereo at family parties and enjoyed by everyone. That is because 80’s rap is universal, it is positive and upbeat, and generally provokes a party atmosphere. It is often slower than the rap we hear today and usually in a major key (meaning it sounds happy), but we’re not complaining. Uhuhuhuhuh!

Rap today is closer to art than music, the mind boggles at how fast some artists can get words out of their mouths and how someone can think so fast on their feet without making one mistake. Eminem has to be credited here; in his “Rap God” he averaged 6.5 words per second, where ‘normal’ people average at 2.5 words per second, that’s a ridiculous difference and proves that Mr. Marshall Mathers, really is a “super human”.

Rap and hip-hop come as a 2 for 1 deal in today’s music spectrum. Kanye, Kendrick, A$AP Rocky, J. Cole, Drake, Tyga, Jay Z; all black, all male, all dominating the hip-hop music industry, and that’s the name just a few. Hip-hop, like rap, is so versatile; there are almost genres within genres.

Today the consensus among artists and the consumer market is that the tone of the hip-hop song is more negative than in previous years. But this is what sells and what audiences want to hear. It feels truthful from the artists, as if they are telling a story very quickly and to instrumental, this is the beauty of hip-hop: each song has a story and each story is the truth.

Grime, is a fairly new genre, as far as genres go; it is to believed to have originated in Hackney, London, in the early 2000’s. Unlike its predecessors (rap and hip-hop) grime is a genre of British origin, and we here in the UK feel very patriotic about our creation.

Grime is usually accompanied by a garage backbeat, and often the artist has an East London accent, however this is not true with all artists and songs. The songs are generally fast paced and again, skillfully rapped over, by absolute music masterminds.

Stormzy, is one of the most influential names in grime this year; and won the best grime act for the past two years at the MOBO awards. Skepta is also very influential, one of his biggest hits being: “That’s Not Me” which repeats that exact phrase after most statements in the song. The repetitiveness is what makes this genre memorable, and why grime is becoming so big in UK clubs and festivals.

They are the songs that everyone knows and everyone can interact with.

Rap, hip-hop and grime make up a big chunk of the UK music market; each genre is inherently different but incorporates the same elements simultaneously. This is how and why the lines have been blurred, but we love this cocktail of music genres, and with new talent emerging in this market almost everyday, we can’t wait to see what’s next.

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